Dec 01, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2020-2021 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2020-2021

Course Descriptions


 

English

  
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    ENGL 301 - English as a Second Language: Issues and Trends


    3 hours

    The central purpose of this course is to provide experience in identifying, analyzing, and discussing significant current issues in the field of English as a Second Language with in-depth study of the history of English as a Second Language instruction. Additional study will focus on articles written by major researchers in this field. This course will also investigate the development and characteristics of various programs used in teaching English to limited English proficient (LEP) students and review current state and federal requirements affecting provision of services for non-English background learners.
    This course is cross-listed with EDUC 301 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL
  
  •  

    ENGL 302 - English as a Second Language: Strategies and Methods


    3 hours

    See EDUC 302  for course description.
    This course is cross-listed with EDUC 302 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    ENGL 306 - Creative Writing: Literary Nonfiction (W)


    3 hours

    Students in this course will use creative writing craft to compose personal essays in a variety of forms. Students will read and analyze examples of both classical and contemporary creative non-fiction as models of effective writing. Writing assignments will be peer-reviewed in a workshop setting. Students will submit a substantial portfolio of original work tailored to their interests over the course of the semester. In addition, students will create and maintain a writer’s blog (or vlog) as a platform for their work.
    FALL, odd years
  
  •  

    ENGL 307 - Creative Writing: Fiction (W)


    3 hours

    In this course, students will deepen their understanding of what makes nano-fiction, short stories, and novels effective through the reading of contemporary writers and the writing of original work that will be peer-reviewed in a workshop setting. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the writer’s voice. Students will submit a substantial portfolio of original work written over the course of the semester and tailored to their interests.
    FALL, even years
  
  •  

    ENGL 308 - Creative Writing: Poetry (W)


    3 hours

    Students in this course will study the elements of writing poetry from the use of imagery and figurative language to both formal and organic poetic forms. Students will study contemporary poetry for writer’s craft and submit their work for peer-review in a workshop setting. Emphasis will be placed on the development of a collection of poetry ready for publication, which will be submitted as a portfolio of work written over the course of the semester.
    WINTER, even years
  
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    ENGL 309 - Readings in English


    1 hour

    Topics selected from language, literature, rhetoric, theory, or related areas of English. Online only.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    ENGL 313 - Expository Writing (W)


    3 hours

    A workshop approach that provides practical instruction in expository writing for all disciplines. Emphasizes developing a natural writing style; writing economical but lively prose; increasing vocabulary; and cultivating a writing process which frees writer’s block and facilitates thoughtful, cogent, focused, coherent, and fluent writing. Involves reading and analysis of a wide variety of writing. Helpful for all students wishing to improve their writing skills, particularly those headed for graduate school or for professions in which writing is important. Tailored to the needs and interests of students who enroll.
    FALL
  
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    ENGL 317 - Introduction to Linguistics


    3 hours

    This class offers an overview of linguistic analysis. Using basic concepts from phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and sociolinguistics, students examine the nature of language and its pedagogical implications. The course also briefly surveys the history and development of the English language.
    FALL
  
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    ENGL 320 - Rhetoric: The Performance of Argument


    3 hours

    A survey of the theories and techniques of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the present. Particular attention is given to the ways in which contemporary writers can create appropriate rhetorical strategies for communicating in their own social and cultural contexts.
    WINTER
  
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    ENGL 414 - Mapping the Publication Maze


    3 hours

    This course is designed for serious, experienced creative writers who plan to publish their writing. Instruction will be given regarding the different options for publication today and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students will research potential publication venues for their work and will be required to submit their writing for publication during the semester.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 307  or ENGL 308  and portfolio.
    FALL, odd years
  
  •  

    ENGL 420 - Technical and Professional Writing


    3 hours

    A course created to teach students to design and produce documents that communicate professional and technical information effectively and efficiently. The course will emphasize the clarity, accuracy, and correctness demanded by writing in various workplace genres, for example, letters, memos, reports, directions, and explanations. Students will learn to analyze audience needs and modify their communications accordingly. Lab Fee: 4 ($30).
    This course is cross-listed with COMM 420 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL
  
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    ENGL 460 - Senior Research Project in English


    1 hour

    In this course, which all English majors are required to pass, students will learn how to enter academic conversations, craft arguments, and draw conclusions based on intensive research, writing, and discussion. The product, a full-length academic essay, may be presented at an academic conference and/or used as a writing sample for graduate school or job applications. Enrollment is limited to two students per upper-division English class, and not all classes will accommodate this project in a given semester. Additional information appears in the current “Senior Research Project in English” guidelines.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    ENGL 465 - Topics in English


    1-3 hours

    Selected topics in English presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine how the class applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    ENGL 476 - Practicum: English as a Second Language


    1 hour

    Supervised experience in a community setting working with adult ESL students, including a minimum of twenty (20) clock hours of teaching in a community setting, maintaining a reflective teaching journal of classroom experiences, building a portfolio of lesson plans and materials development, and participating in TESOL webinars or use of other training materials. Can be waived with relevant student missionary experience.
     
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    ENGL 491 - English Practicum


    0-3 hours

    The student gains on-the-job experience using English skills in a part-time work situation (maximum of 25 hours per week). A department coordinator works with the student and a local business to oversee placement and evaluation. Both the student and the business assess in writing the quality and nature of the work experience. The student receives 1 credit hour for each 50 hours of work experience. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised work is required as a major requirement. Positions can be paid or non-paid. Procedures and guidelines are available from the department. (Pass/Fail credit).
    Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in the major, ENGL 313 , and formal approval by the department.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
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    ENGL 493 - English Internship


    0-3 hours

    The student gains on-the-job experience using English skills in a full-time work situation (minimum of 35 hours per week). A department coordinator works with the student and a selected business to oversee placement and evaluation. Both the student and the business assess in writing the quality and nature of the work experience. A minimum of 150 hours of supervised work is required. Positions can be paid or non-paid. Procedures and guidelines are available from the department. (Pass/Fail credit).
    Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in the major, ENGL 313 , and formal approval by the department.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
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    ENGL 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See ENGL 295  for course description.
    FALL | WINTER

Engineering

  
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    ENGR 121 - Introduction to Engineering


    1 hour

    Exposure to the diverse aspects of the profession and practice of engineering and engineering design. Class will include guest lecturers and engineering design projects. Lab Fee: 4 ($ 30).
    FALL
  
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    ENGR 149 - Introduction to Mechanical Drawing and CADD


    3 hours

    An introductory level course in Computer-Aided Drafting Design (CADD) using AutoCAD software in orthographic projection, surface development, sectioning, pictorial representation, dimensioning, and working drawings. Drawings plotted to scale on A, B, C, and D size paper. Six periods of laboratory each week. Lecture as announced by the instructor. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    This course is cross-listed with TECH 149 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL
  
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    ENGR 211 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics


    3 hours

    Two and three-dimensional equilibria employing vector algebra, moment of a force, friction, structural analysis, centroids and center of mass, virtual work, and moments of inertia.
    Pre- or Co-requisite: MATH 192  ; PHYS 221 .
    FALL
  
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    ENGR 212 - Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics


    3 hours

    One and two-dimensional kinetics and kinematics of rigid bodies by vector calculus; dynamics of rotation, translation and plane motion; relative motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum.
    Pre- or Co-requisite: ENGR 211 ; MATH 218 ; PHYS 222 .
    WINTER
  
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    ENGR 228 - Linear Circuit Analysis


    3 hours

    Basic concepts of DC and AC circuit theory and analysis. Basic concepts of circuit behavior, circuit analysis theorems and methods, and RLC circuits including circuit variables and parameters; Kirchoff’s laws and network solution; equivalent circuits, network theorems; natural and complete response; sinusoidal steady-state, phasors, and impedance. Introduction to test and measurement instrumentation, experimental techniques for analysis and characterization of electrical circuits. Includes three hours of laboratory each week.
    Pre- or Co-requisite: Pre- or co-requisites: PHYS 222 .
    WINTER
  
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    ENGR 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    Individual or group work adjusted to meet particular needs of engineering studies students. Formal written report required. May be repeated for credit.

Earth Science

  
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    ERSC 105 - Earth Science (IN-7)


    3 hours

    A non-mathematical and qualitative introduction, for non-science majors, to the areas of physical geography, geology, and meteorology. Special consideration is given the environment-conservation or pollution of natural resources.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER

Finance

  
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    FNCE 265 - Topics in Finance


    1-3 hours

    Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of business and management. This course may be repeated for credit with permission.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FNCE 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    A directed study involves individualized research into a selected topic chosen by the faculty adviser and the student.
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Dean of the School.
  
  •  

    FNCE 315 - Principles of Finance


    3 hours

    A study of the fundamental principles of financial organization. Emphasis is on instruments of finance, policies of capitalization, problems pertaining to working capital, and corporate expansion and reorganization.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 222  with a grade of C or higher.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FNCE 425 - International Finance


    3 hours

    Financial management and economic theory in the international environment. The impact of regulation, taxation, capital and money markets, working capital management, capital budgeting, risk, and exchange rates on decision-making are considered. Consideration is also given to the development and application of economic principles within the world economy.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    WINTER
  
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    FNCE 448 - Corporate Finance


    3 hours

    This course explores advanced topics in regard to corporate financial management. The objective is to focus on the factors that influence the decisions of corporate managers and the impact of those decisions on the value creation of the firm in terms of working capital, capital investment, capital structure, and shareholder distributions. The approach of the course will be rigorous and analytical. The topics covered include: working capital issues, capital budgeting topics, capital structure, leases, hybrid securities, derivatives, shareholder distributions, mergers, divestitures, firm failure, and international financial issues.
    This course is cross-listed with FNCE 548. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    WINTER
  
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    FNCE 450 - Working Capital Management


    3 hours

    Includes topics addressing short-term financial management. In addition, the course covers the cost to benefit trade-offs of liquidity, management of working capital, management and budgeting of cash, and short-term investing and financing issues.
    This course is cross-listed with FNCE 550. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    WINTER
  
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    FNCE 452 - Financial Markets


    3 hours

    See ECON 452  for course description.
    This course is cross-listed with ECON 452  and FNCE 552. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 224 FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    FALL, even years
  
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    FNCE 455 - Fundamentals of Investments


    3 hours

    A practical, as well as a theoretical, approach is taken for the potential investor of institutional or personal funds through the use of problems, readings, and cases. Topics covered will include stocks and bonds in the security market, real estate, and fixed equipment investments.
    This course is cross-listed with FNCE 555. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    FALL
  
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    FNCE 461 - Portfolio Management


    3 hours

    Includes consideration of investment instrument choices that are available to the investor and the purpose and operation of U.S. and global capital markets. The course also covers the methods of evaluation for current and future investment opportunities in the expansion of a portfolio of investments that satisfies an investor’s risk-return goals.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher.
    Winter, even years
  
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    FNCE 465 - Topics in Finance


    1-3 hours

    See FNCE 265  for course description.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315  with a grade of B or higher or Permission of the instructor.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FNCE 491 - Finance Practicum


    0-3 hours

    A practicum consists of supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of accounting/finance on a part-time basis. The work may be done at various job sites. A minimum of 50 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. Students choosing 0 hours will receive a grade of pass/fail. (Note: A maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.)
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status and permission of a supervising professor. (Registration for this course and an agreement with a supervising professor must be completed prior to beginning the work experience).
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
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    FNCE 492 - Finance Internship


    0-3 hours

    An internship consists of on-the-job experience working under supervision in an accounting/finance office on a full-time basis. All hours must be completed on one job site. A minimum of 100 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. Students choosing 0 hours will receive a grade of pass/fail. (Note: A maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.)
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status and permission of a supervising professor. (Registration for this course and an agreement with a supervising professor must be completed prior to beginning the work experience).
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
  •  

    FNCE 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See FNCE 295  for course description.
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Dean of the School.
  
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    FNCE 497 - Finance Research


    3 hours

    This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data leading to the completion of a research project.
    Prerequisite(s):  ; FNCE 450 .
    FALL | WINTER

French

  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    3 hours

    This is a foundation course in basic language skills. Students who have any background in French must take the language placement examination. Students should contact department for details on specific scores. This course develops listening and reading strategies with emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 102 - Elementary French II


    3 hours

    This course is a continuation of the development of basic language skills. Written and oral communication is strongly emphasized. It concentrates on developing the ability to use the language creatively to deal with daily life situations within the French-speaking context. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 101  or score a minimum of 296 on placement examination, or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 207 - Intermediate French I


    3 hours

    Review and expansion of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the culture of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102  or score a minimum of 356 on placement examination, or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
  •  

    FREN 208 - Intermediate French II


    3 hours

    Continues to review and expand student-knowledge of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the culture of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 207  or score a minimum of 440 on placement examination or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 244 - French Composition and Conversation


    3 hours

    Course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion, and to review grammatical structures. It emphasizes description and narration, extending to the broader French-speaking world. FREN 244 and FREN 344  is a strongly suggested sequence for students who minor in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    FREN 265 - Topics in French


    1-3 hours

    Selected topics in French presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine how the course applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    Emphasizes individual, directed study. Designed for students who want to conduct independent research in a specific subject in the field of modern languages. Faculty will assist student with selection of topic and serve as consultant for the project. This course is limited primarily to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern Languages.
  
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    FREN 305 - French for Business


    3 hours

    This course seeks to develop knowledge and proficiency in the French economic and business world. It includes vocabulary review; practice of oral and written expression, marketing, banking, employment, job hunting, interviewing, accounting, and publicity. Written expression of business correspondence is one of the topics discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of one (1) academic year at Collonges (ACA) prior to taking this course.
  
  •  

    FREN 344 - Advanced French Composition and Conversation


    3 hours

    Designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion, and to review grammatical structures. It focuses on Nous and Les Autres, incorporating description and narration, extending to the broader French-speaking world, incorporating current events and argumentation along with vocabulary study and grammar refinement. FREN 244  and 344 is a sequence particularly suggested for students who minor in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  and FREN 244  or approval of the department.
  
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    FREN 350 - French Linguistics


    3 hours

    An intensive course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion. It focuses on the study of syntax, morphology, phonetics, and phonology as components of the generative grammar of the French language. Open to eligible students returning from ACA. This course is required for majors in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  and FREN 244  or equivalent, or approval of the department.
  
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    FREN 353 - Contemporary French Culture and Civilization (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    This course focuses on contemporary French culture and civilization and emphasizes social, political, and artistic trends, and intellectual movements that have contributed to the institutions and character of modern France. Course conducted entirely in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  or approval of the department.
  
  •  

    FREN 357 - Survey of French Medieval and Renaissance Literature (W)


    3 hours

    Close reading and discussion of selected works from the period (eleventh through sixteenth centuries) viewed in the socio-historical, intellectual, and artistic context: Chanson de Roland, Roman de Renart, Aucassin et Nicolette, Farce de Maître Pathelin, and works by Chrétien de Troyes, Villon, Rabelais, the Pléiade, and Montaigne.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  and MDLG 230  or approval of the department.
  
  •  

    FREN 358 - Survey of French 17th and 18th Centuries Literature (W)


    3 hours

    This course is a study of neo-classical tragedy and comedy as illustrated in select texts of Corneille, Mohère, Racine, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. It experiments in narrative fiction, including works by Mme de Lafayette and Prévost. The art of epistolarity: Pascal and the polemical letter, Mme de Sévigné and the personal letter, Voltaire and the traveler’s letter. Focus on topics: préciosité and sensibility; feminism and modernity; rationalism and esprit critique.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  and MDLG 230  or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 458 - Survey of French 19th and 20th Centuries Literature (W)


    3 hours

    Studies the main literary works and currents in the modern era in their historical context. Based on an interdisciplinary approach linking literary theory with history, sociology, and psychology. Works studied: Chateaubriand, Réné; Balzac, Le Père Goriot; Hugo, Hernani; Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal; Gide, La Symphonie pastorale; Camus, L’Etranger; Duras, Moderato Cantabile.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  and MDLG 230  or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 459 - Francophone Cultures and Literatures (W)


    3 hours

    This course proposes a cultural and literary journey based on a variety of texts throughout the main French-speaking regions of the world: the African continent, South East Asia, French Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, the French-speaking islands of the Caribbean. This approach is intended to stress and place into perspective these geographical and national entities. Guest-speakers closely related, either as native speakers or by their professional experience to French-speaking Africa, Canada, or the Caribbean will be invited when available.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  and MDLG 230  or approval of the department.
  
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    FREN 465 - Topics in French


    1-3 hours

    See FREN 265  for course description.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 490 - Comprehensive Examination Preparation


    1 hour

    This course is designed to provide academic support for French majors who will be taking the MCE required for graduation. One member of the faculty will meet with the student regularly to provide the opportunity to cover material pertinent to this examination. French majors must take this course in the last semester prior to graduation. Results of the MCE will be the final grade for this course.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See FREN 295  for course description.

Geography

  
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    GEOG 204 - World Geography (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are considered. Man’s adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. Lab Fee: 4 ($30).
    WINTER

Global Community Development

  
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    GCDP 405 - Foundations of Christian Values and Witness in Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will assimilate Biblical perspectives for abundant life, transformation, servanthood, and the role of Christian witness in sustainable development missiology.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 410 - Theories of Global Community Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will examine diverse theoretical approaches for planning, conducting, and evaluating community-owned development/relief projects.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    GCDP 415 - Principles of Development Entrepreneurship


    2 hours

    Students will identify resource generation opportunities and craft entrepreneurship strategies that enables sustainable community change.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    GCDP 420 - Techniques for Project Planning and Capacity Building


    2 hours

    Students will explore and define how they will assist community leaders to plan, propose, budget, and staff results-oriented development/relief projects.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    GCDP 425 - Methods of Scholarship in Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will demonstrate the research scholarship skills necessary for facilitating evidenced-based and results-oriented community practice outcomes.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    GCDP 428 - Preparation for Global Service


    1 hour

    In this course students will prepare for their deployment to the project site of their Experiential Learning rotation. Logistical, safety, and practical preparedness will be addressed.
    SUMMER
  
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    GCDP 465 - Special Topics Seminar


    1 hour

    In this seminar, students will explore topics of current significant and/or professional interest for a specific sector in global community development/relief.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 492 - Field Practice Internship


    1-7 hours

    Opportunity for experiential internship learning in development practice settings. One hundred hours of internship must be done for each credit. Field learning will evidence competencies of knowledge, values, and skills that students have accumulated during their degree program. This course will be graded pass/fail.
    FALL | WINTER| SUMMER

German

  
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    GRMN 101 - Elementary German I


    3 hours

    A foundation course in the basic language skills. Laboratory work is required. Students who have not taken any German language must enroll in GRMN 101. This course develops listening and reading strategies with an emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    FALL
  
  •  

    GRMN 102 - Elementary German II


    3 hours

    This course is a continuation of the development of basic language skills. Oral and written communication are strongly emphasized. Laboratory work is required. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 101  or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    GRMN 207 - Intermediate German I


    3 hours

    Continued emphasis on the development of listening and speaking skills. There is, however, an increased emphasis on reading and writing skills through short selections in German. Laboratory work is required. Students may receive credit by passing a “Challenge Examination” with a grade of B or better. For information on the examination, students should refer to Southern’s Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 102  or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
  •  

    GRMN 208 - Intermediate German II


    3 hours

    This course maintains a strong emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Through reading of more extensive texts and informal writing as a support for speaking, it develops oral fluency toward more effective narrative. Laboratory work is required. Students may receive credit by passing a “Challenge Examination” with a grade of B or better. For information on this examination, students should refer to Southern’s Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 207  or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    GRMN 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    A course emphasizing individual directed study. This course is for students who want to conduct independent research in a specific subject of modern languages. Faculty will assist students with selection of topic and serve as a consultant for the project. This course is limited primarily to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern Languages.
  
  •  

    GRMN 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See GRMN 295  for course description.

History

  
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    HIST 145 - The American Civil War: From the Cornfields to the Battlefields


    3 hours

    This course covers the American Civil War, from the major figures and the politics and battles they fought, to the common soldiers on the fields of battle and the civilians on the home front. A variety of resources are used in the class, including primary source material, texts, and various other secondary sources. No general education credit given.
  
  •  

    HIST 154 - U.S. History through the Civil War (IN-6)


    3 hours

    An introductory survey of the nation from colonial times to reconstruction. The development of its politics, government and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
  
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    HIST 155 - U.S. History since the Civil War (IN-6)


    3 hours

    An introductory survey of the nation from reconstruction to the present. The development of its politics, government and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
  
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    HIST 174 - World Societies to 1500 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
  
  •  

    HIST 175 - World Societies since 1500 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
  
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    HIST 265 - Topics in History


    3 hours

    Selected topics in history presented in classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine whether credit is granted in Area I or Area II. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HIST 278 - History of Western Architecture


    3 hours

    Studies of the history of western architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular monuments and their settings. Domestic architecture and infrastructure, regional constructional, and compositional traditions from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance through to the 20th century.
    This course is cross-listed with TECH 278 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s):   with a grade of C- or better.
  
  •  

    HIST 280 - Technology and Power (IN-6)


    3 hours

    Utilizing a combination of primary and secondary sources, this honors history course will look at the dramatic extension of European power into Asia, Africa, and the Americas, beginning in the 15th century and proceeding through the 19th century. We will examine how the interplay among accumulated technique, a culture of competition, and varying environments led to extensive conquest. We will further consider how societies choose how and to what extent to utilize available technologies to pursue national goals.
  
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    HIST 294 - International Study Tour


    3 hours

    Study tours led by historians outside the United States of America will combine tourism with reading and writing based on primary and/or secondary texts which support the study of the places being visited. Lab Fee: Additional fees may be charged.
    SUMMER
  
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    HIST 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a student is assigned will determine whether credit is upper or lower division. This course also includes credit offered by the History Department on directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for HIST 495  only. Approval of the department is required prior to registration.
  
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    HIST 296 - U.S. Study Tour


    3 hours

    Study tours led by historians in the United States of America will combine tourism with reading and writing based on primary and/or secondary texts which support the study of the places being visited.

     

  
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    HIST 298 - Historiography (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    A course examining historiography, which is the study of historical consciousness and historical writing. The class will focus on Western historiography (classical, European, and the United States). General education credit will not be given. Lab Fee: 16 ($500).
  
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    HIST 312 - Historical and Political Geography


    3 hours

    This course considers the interaction between world cultures, environments, and geographic regions to explain patterns of human history and political development.
  
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    HIST 345 - Middle Eastern Politics and History (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    This course traces the major religious and political developments in the Middle East from the rise of Islam through the twentieth century. Any or all of the following topics may be included: Islamic empires; Crusades; Ottoman nationalism; Islam’s encounter with the West; the issue of Islamic-Arab nationalism.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 345 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
     

     

  
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    HIST 351 - Colonial Latin America (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    Set in the context of Spanish empire and imperial ideology, the course begins with the cultural legacy of high pre-Columbian civilizations in Latin America and traces the interaction of the native people with Spanish exploration and conquest. It focuses primarily on Spanish political and social organization, the responses of the native people to growing Spanish political hegemony, and the gradual development of theories of race, empire, faith which culminated in a recognizably unified Spanish American world.
  
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    HIST 352 - Nineteenth Century America (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of American history from the early republic to the 20th century, including Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America, the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Gilded Age.
  
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    HIST 353 - From Colony to Nation (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A detailed survey of American political and social history from 1607 to 1800, including the founding of the thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the new nation.
  
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    HIST 355 - History of the South (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the American South from the Early National period through Reconstruction. Prominent issues will include slavery, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
  
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    HIST 356 - Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration in American History (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of immigration and the role of ethnic groups in American society. Special emphasis on the tension between assimilation and pluralism in the national character.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 356 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
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    HIST 357 - Modern America (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of American History from 1900 on with special examination of the progressive era, normalcy, the depression, the New Deal, and the role of the United States in world affairs.
  
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    HIST 359 - Transformation of American Culture (W)


    3 hours

    A topical approach to nineteenth and twentieth-century American history, focusing on the modernization of life. Among the topics that may be covered are entertainment, the media, urban culture, social relations, transportation, and art and architecture.
  
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    HIST 363 - Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the history of western Christianity from the end of the apostolic period to the end of the Middle Ages, emphasizing both institutional and theological development.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 364 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.

     
  
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    HIST 364 - Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    See HIST 363  for course description.
  
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    HIST 365 - Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth Century (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends.
  
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    HIST 366 - Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth Century (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 365 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
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    HIST 372 - Modern China


    3 hours

    This course on both ‘modern Chinese history’ and ‘China today’ examines events and periods in China’s history since the Opium Wars. Throughout the semester students will also be given readings and will participate in discussions which juxtapose modern Chinese history with current events in China today. Thus this course is more than just a study of modern Chinese history, but also a study of how that history impacts the Chinese today. Students will use Chinese history as a tool for understanding the direction and decisions of the Chinese government and the challenges that government faces in the contemporary era. These contemporary challenges will also be placed within the context of three broad themes that appear most important to the Communist Chinese Party today: Stability, sustainability, and territorial integrity. Within these themes major challenges facing China today will be framed within a historical perspective and students will develop a new lens, a Chinese historical lens, through which they will use to interpret contemporary China.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 372 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
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    HIST 374 - History of England (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A survey of the history of Great Britain from Roman times to the twentieth century, emphasizing political, cultural, and economic developments which have influenced western civilization as a whole.
    FALL, even years
  
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    HIST 375 - Ancient Mediterranean World (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the three stages of ancient civilization, the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and the contribution each has made to the development of western culture.
  
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    HIST 379 - American Foreign Policy


    3 hours

    This course will examine American foreign policy since the mid-1930s. Major themes of American foreign policy and diplomacy will be engaged. This will begin with American public diplomacy in the late 1930s, will continue through WWII, shifting strategies during the Cold War, in the post-Cold War, and post-9/11. We will also touch on the nuts and bolts of policy making and how the State Department’s Foreign Services Officers, the military’s Special Forces, and the CIA’s clandestine Directorate of Operations help inform, shape, and carry out American foreign policy. Special attention will also be given to the role religion has played in the shaping of American foreign policy.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 379 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
 

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