Oct 21, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Finance

  
  •  

    FNCE 450 - Working Capital Management


    3 hours

    Includes topics addressing short-term financial management. In addition, the course covers the cost to benefit trade-offs of liquidity, management of working capital, management and budgeting of cash, and short-term investing and financing issues.
    This course is cross-listed with FNCE 550. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): FNCE 315 .
    WINTER
  
  •  

    FNCE 452 - Financial Markets, Rates, and Flows


    3 hours

    See ECON 452  for course description.
    This course is cross-listed with ECON 452  and FNCE 552. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 224  and FNCE 315 .
    FALL
  
  •  

    FNCE 455 - Fundamentals of Investments


    3 hours

    A practical, as well as a theoretical, approach is taken for the potential investor of institutional or personal funds through the use of problems, readings, and cases. Topics covered will include stocks and bonds in the security market, real estate, and fixed equipment investments.
    This course is cross-listed with FNCE 555. A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL
  
  •  

    FNCE 461 - Portfolio Management


    3 hours

    Includes consideration of investment instrument choices that are available to the investor and the purpose and operation of U.S. and global capital markets. The course also covers the methods of evaluation for current and future investment opportunities in the expansion of a portfolio of investments that satisfies an investor’s risk-return goals.
  
  •  

    FNCE 465 - Topics in Finance


    1-3 hours

    See FNCE 265  for course description.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FNCE 491 - Finance Practicum


    0-3 hours

    A practicum consists of supervised volunteer/work experience in related fields of accounting/finance on a part-time basis. The work may be done at various job sites. A minimum of 50 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. Students choosing 0 hours will receive a grade of pass/fail. (Note: A maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.)
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status and permission of a supervising professor. (Registration for this course and an agreement with a supervising professor must be completed prior to beginning the work experience).
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
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    FNCE 492 - Finance Internship


    0-3 hours

    An internship consists of on-the-job experience working under supervision in an accounting/finance office on a full-time basis. All hours must be completed on one job site. A minimum of 100 clock hours of work experience is required for each semester hour of credit. Students choosing 0 hours will receive a grade of pass/fail. (Note: A maximum of 3 credit hours of practicum and/or internship may apply as an elective in the major.)
    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior status and permission of a supervising professor. (Registration for this course and an agreement with a supervising professor must be completed prior to beginning the work experience).
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
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    FNCE 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See FNCE 295  for course description.
    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Dean of the School.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FNCE 497 - Finance Research


    3 hours

    This course permits students to apply principles of research and statistical analysis of data leading to the completion of a research project.
    Prerequisite(s): BUAD 221  or  ; FNCE 450 .
    FALL | WINTER

French

  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    3 hours

    This is a foundation course in basic language skills. Students who have any background in French must take the language placement examination. Students should contact department for details on specific scores. This course develops listening and reading strategies with emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    FALL
  
  •  

    FREN 102 - Elementary French II


    3 hours

    This course is a continuation of the development of basic language skills. Written and oral communication is strongly emphasized. It concentrates on developing the ability to use the language creatively to deal with daily life situations within the French-speaking context. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 101  or score a minimum of 296 on placement examination, or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 207 - Intermediate French I


    3 hours

    Review and expansion of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the culture of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102  or score a minimum of 356 on placement examination, or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    FREN 208 - Intermediate French II


    3 hours

    Continues to review and expand student-knowledge of grammar/vocabulary as students develop speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings and discussions focus on topics related to the culture of the French-speaking world. Laboratory work required. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 207  or score a minimum of 440 on placement examination or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    FREN 244 - French Composition and Conversation


    3 hours

    Course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion, and to review grammatical structures. It emphasizes description and narration, extending to the broader French-speaking world. FREN 244 and FREN 344  is a strongly suggested sequence for students who minor in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    FREN 265 - Topics in French


    1-3 hours

    Selected topics in French presented in a classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine how the course applies to the major. This course may be repeated for credit.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    Emphasizes individual, directed study. Designed for students who want to conduct independent research in a specific subject in the field of modern languages. Faculty will assist student with selection of topic and serve as consultant for the project. This course is limited primarily to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern Languages.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 305 - French for Business


    3 hours

    This course seeks to develop knowledge and proficiency in the French economic and business world. It includes vocabulary review; practice of oral and written expression, marketing, banking, employment, job hunting, interviewing, accounting, and publicity. Written expression of business correspondence is one of the topics discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): A minimum of one (1) academic year at Collonges (ACA) prior to taking this course.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 344 - Advanced French Composition and Conversation


    3 hours

    Designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion, and to review grammatical structures. It focuses on Nous and Les Autres, incorporating description and narration, extending to the broader French-speaking world, incorporating current events and argumentation along with vocabulary study and grammar refinement. FREN 244  and 344 is a sequence particularly suggested for students who minor in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  and FREN 244  or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    FREN 350 - French Linguistics


    3 hours

    An intensive course designed to enhance oral and written proficiency along with vocabulary expansion. It focuses on the study of syntax, morphology, phonetics, and phonology as components of the generative grammar of the French language. Open to eligible students returning from ACA. This course is required for majors in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 208  and FREN 244  or equivalent, or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    FREN 353 - Contemporary French Culture and Civilization (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    This course focuses on contemporary French culture and civilization and emphasizes social, political, and artistic trends, and intellectual movements that have contributed to the institutions and character of modern France. Course conducted entirely in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244  or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
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    FREN 357 - Survey of French Medieval and Renaissance Literature (W)


    3 hours

    Close reading and discussion of selected works from the period (eleventh through sixteenth centuries) viewed in the socio-historical, intellectual, and artistic context: Chanson de Roland, Roman de Renart, Aucassin et Nicolette, Farce de Maître Pathelin, and works by Chrétien de Troyes, Villon, Rabelais, the Pléiade, and Montaigne.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244 , ELIT 216  and MDLG 230 , or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 358 - Survey of French 17th and 18th Centuries Literature (W)


    3 hours

    This course is a study of neo-classical tragedy and comedy as illustrated in select texts of Corneille, Mohère, Racine, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. It experiments in narrative fiction, including works by Mme de Lafayette and Prévost. The art of epistolarity: Pascal and the polemical letter, Mme de Sévigné and the personal letter, Voltaire and the traveler’s letter. Focus on topics: préciosité and sensibility; feminism and modernity; rationalism and esprit critique.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244 , ELIT 216  and MDLG 230 , or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 458 - Survey of French 19th and 20th Centuries Literature (W)


    3 hours

    Studies the main literary works and currents in the modern era in their historical context. Based on an interdisciplinary approach linking literary theory with history, sociology, and psychology. Works studied: Chateaubriand, Réné; Balzac, Le Père Goriot; Hugo, Hernani; Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal; Gide, La Symphonie pastorale; Camus, L’Etranger; Duras, Moderato Cantabile.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244 , ELIT 216  and MDLG 230 , or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 459 - Francophone Cultures and Literatures (W)


    3 hours

    This course proposes a cultural and literary journey based on a variety of texts throughout the main French-speaking regions of the world: the African continent, South East Asia, French Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, the French-speaking islands of the Caribbean. This approach is intended to stress and place into perspective these geographical and national entities. Guest-speakers closely related, either as native speakers or by their professional experience to French-speaking Africa, Canada, or the Caribbean will be invited when available.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 244 , ELIT 216  and MDLG 230 , or approval of the department.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 465 - Topics in French


    1-3 hours

    See FREN 265  for course description.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 490 - Comprehensive Examination Preparation


    1 hour

    This course is designed to provide academic support for French majors who will be taking the MCE required for graduation. One member of the faculty will meet with the student regularly to provide the opportunity to cover material pertinent to this examination. French majors must take this course in the last semester prior to graduation. Results of the MCE will be the final grade for this course.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    FREN 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See FREN 295  for course description.
    FALL | WINTER

Geography

  
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    GEOG 204 - World Geography (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    Maps, land forms, soil, mineral resources, weather, and climate are considered. Man’s adjustment to various physiographic regions is studied. Lab Fee: 4 ($30).
    WINTER

Global Community Development

  
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    GCDP 405 - Foundations of Christian Values and Witness in Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will assimilate Biblical perspectives for abundant life, transformation, servanthood, and the role of Christian witness in sustainable development missiology.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 410 - Theories of Global Community Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will examine diverse theoretical approaches for planning, conducting, and evaluating community-owned development/relief projects.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 415 - Principles of Development Entrepreneurship


    2 hours

    Students will identify resource generation opportunities and craft entrepreneurship strategies that enables sustainable community change.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 420 - Techniques for Project Planning and Capacity Building


    2 hours

    Students will explore and define how they will assist community leaders to plan, propose, budget, and staff results-oriented development/relief projects.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 425 - Methods of Scholarship in Development/Relief


    2 hours

    Students will demonstrate the research scholarship skills necessary for facilitating evidenced-based and results-oriented community practice outcomes.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 465 - Special Topics Seminar


    1 hour

    In this seminar, students will explore topics of current significant and/or professional interest for a specific sector in global community development/relief.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GCDP 492 - Field Practice Internship


    1-7 hours

    Opportunity for experiential internship learning in development practice settings. One hundred hours of internship must be done for each credit. Field learning will evidence competencies of knowledge, values, and skills that students have accumulated during their degree program. This course will be graded pass/fail.

Global Policy and Service Studies

  
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    GPSS 110 - Human Rights and Service (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    This course examines the history of human rights and current human rights issues. Best practices of social entrepreneurs in the human rights arena are analyzed. An application is made to how Seventh-day Adventists individually and corporately can relate to human rights issues.
  
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    GPSS 220 - International Relations and Global Politics


    3 hours

    This course examines the politics of the global arena to foster understanding so that students can better serve the world’s inhabitants. A comparison is made between secular international relations theory and a biblical worldview.
  
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    GPSS 250 - Cross-Cultural Experience


    3 hours

    This course offers principles of cultural appropriateness and conflict resolution in the political and developmental arena.
  
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    GPSS 265 - Topics in GPSS


    3 hours

    Selected topics designed to meet the needs or interests of students in specialty areas of global policy and service studies. This course may be repeated for credit with permission.
  
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    GPSS 291 - GPS Practicum


    3 hours

    Practicum requirements include at least 150 hours at an organization approved by the course instructor and an in-depth reflection assignment on the practicum.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    GPSS 350 - Sustainability Agriculture (SERV-2)


    3 hours

    Topics include examining sustainable agriculture through the lens of health and education as a means for maintaining ecological, societal, and spiritual balance. Lab Fee: 6 ($90).
    FALL
  
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    GPSS 360 - Political Economy


    3 hours

    This course analyzes global economic institution and delves into political and social barriers to economic development. Practical skills in prosperity creation at the micro-level are discussed.
  
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    GPSS 370 - Policies in Global Health (W)


    3 hours

    Topics include best practices in health policy, management, lifestyle medicine, and community based development.
  
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    GPSS 465 - Topics in GPSS


    3 hours

    See GPSS 265  for course description.
  
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    GPSS 480 - Research Methods


    3 hours

    Students will learn original research skills and theories in the social and political sciences, assess Christian Biblical approaches to political studies theory, and embark on an individual research project, in consultation with the professor. The result will be a publishable article-length piece of scholarship. Lab Fee: 6 ($90).
  
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    GPSS 490 - Oral Exam


    1 hour

    List of readings and study guide questions to be assessed in a one-hour oral exam during the fall semester of the senior year. Students will be given a chance to connect the ideas from their courses with their Christian Biblical worldview and to demonstrate verbal facility with the major concepts of their major’s curricula.
    FALL
  
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    GPSS 491 - GPS Practicum


    3 hours

    Practicum requirements include at least 150 hours at an organization approved by the course instructor and an in-depth reflection assignment on the practicum.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
  
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    GPSS 499 - Oral Exam


    1 hour

    Lists of readings and study guide questions to be assessed in a one-hour oral exam during the senior year.
    FALL | WINTER

German

  
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    GRMN 101 - Elementary German I


    3 hours

    A foundation course in the basic language skills. Laboratory work is required. Students who have not taken any German language must enroll in GRMN 101. This course develops listening and reading strategies with an emphasis on oral and written forms of communication. Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    FALL
  
  •  

    GRMN 102 - Elementary German II


    3 hours

    This course is a continuation of the development of basic language skills. Oral and written communication are strongly emphasized. Laboratory work is required. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 101  or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
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    GRMN 207 - Intermediate German I


    3 hours

    Continued emphasis on the development of listening and speaking skills. There is, however, an increased emphasis on reading and writing skills through short selections in German. Laboratory work is required. Students may receive credit by passing a “Challenge Examination” with a grade of B or better. For information on the examination, students should refer to Southern’s Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 102  or approval of the department.
    FALL
  
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    GRMN 208 - Intermediate German II


    3 hours

    This course maintains a strong emphasis on listening and speaking skills. Through reading of more extensive texts and informal writing as a support for speaking, it develops oral fluency toward more effective narrative. Laboratory work is required. Students may receive credit by passing a “Challenge Examination” with a grade of B or better. For information on this examination, students should refer to Southern’s Catalog and/or Modern Languages faculty for details. Those students who have any background in German must seek departmental permission to enroll in any German course other than GRMN 101 . Lab Fee: 3 ($20).
    Prerequisite(s): GRMN 207  or approval of the department.
    WINTER
  
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    GRMN 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    A course emphasizing individual directed study. This course is for students who want to conduct independent research in a specific subject of modern languages. Faculty will assist students with selection of topic and serve as a consultant for the project. This course is limited primarily to the department majors and must be approved by the Chair of Modern Languages.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    GRMN 495 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    See GRMN 295  for course description.
    FALL | WINTER

History

  
  •  

    HIST 154 - American History to 1877 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    An introductory survey of the nation from colonial times to reconstruction. The development of its politics, government and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
  •  

    HIST 155 - American History since 1877 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    An introductory survey of the nation from reconstruction to the present. The development of its politics, government and social institutions is covered in each semester of the sequence. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
  •  

    HIST 174 - World Societies to 1500 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
    FALL | WINTER | SUMMER
  
  •  

    HIST 175 - World Societies since 1500 (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the development of Western and non-Western culture and government, emphasizing the evolution of European society and its interaction with non-European civilizations. This course is recommended as general education for freshmen and sophomores.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 265 - Topics in History


    3 hours

    Selected topics in history presented in classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine whether credit is granted in Area I or Area II. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
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    HIST 278 - History of Western Architecture


    3 hours

    Studies of the history of western architecture and urban design. Focus on religious and secular monuments and their settings. Domestic architecture and infrastructure, regional constructional, and compositional traditions from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance through to the 20th century.
    This course is cross-listed with TECH 278 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s):   with a grade of C- or better.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 280 - Technology and Power (IN-6)


    3 hours

    Utilizing a combination of primary and secondary sources, this honors history course will look at the dramatic extension of European power into Asia, Africa, and the Americas, beginning in the 15th century and proceeding through the 19th century. We will examine how the interplay among accumulated technique, a culture of competition, and varying environments led to extensive conquest. We will further consider how societies choose how and to what extent to utilize available technologies to pursue national goals.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 294 - International Study Tour


    3 hours

    Study tours led by historians outside the United States of America will combine tourism with reading and writing based on primary and/or secondary texts which support the study of the places being visited.
    SUMMER
  
  •  

    HIST 295 - Directed Study


    1-3 hours

    A course emphasizing individual directed study. The instructor to whom a student is assigned will determine whether credit is upper or lower division. This course also includes credit offered by the History Department on directed study tours. Writing emphasis credit for HIST 495  only. Approval of the department is required prior to registration.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    HIST 296 - U.S. Study Tour


    3 hours

    Study tours led by historians in the United States of America will combine tourism with reading and writing based on primary and/or secondary texts which support the study of the places being visited.

     

  
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    HIST 297 - Historiography (SERV-2)


    2 hours

    A course examining historiography, which is the study of historical consciousness and historical writing. The class will focus on Western historiography (classical, European, and the United States). General education credit will not be given. Lab Fee: 4 ($30).
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 345 - Middle Eastern Politics and History (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    This course traces the major religious and political developments in the Middle East from the rise of Islam through the twentieth century. Any or all of the following topics may be included: Islamic empires; Crusades; Ottoman nationalism; Islam’s encounter with the West; the issue of Islamic-Arab nationalism.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 345 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
  •  

    HIST 351 - Colonial Latin America (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    Set in the context of Spanish empire and imperial ideology, the course begins with the cultural legacy of high pre-Columbian civilizations in Latin America and traces the interaction of the native people with Spanish exploration and conquest. It focuses primarily on Spanish political and social organization, the responses of the native people to growing Spanish political hegemony, and the gradual development of theories of race, empire, faith which culminated in a recognizably unified Spanish American world.
  
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    HIST 353 - From Colony to Nation (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A detailed survey of American political and social history from 1607 to 1800, including the founding of the thirteen colonies, the American Revolution, and the establishment of the new nation.
  
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    HIST 355 - History of the South (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the American South from the Early National period through Reconstruction. Prominent issues will include slavery, sectionalism, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 356 - Natives and Strangers (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of immigration and the role of ethnic groups in American society. Special emphasis on the tension between assimilation and pluralism in the national character.
    This course is cross-listed with SOCI 356 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 357 - Modern America (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of American History from 1900 on with special examination of the progressive era, normalcy, the depression, the New Deal, and the role of the United States in world affairs.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    HIST 359 - Transformation of American Culture (W)


    3 hours

    A topical approach to nineteenth and twentieth-century American history, focusing on the modernization of life. Among the topics that may be covered are entertainment, the media, urban culture, social relations, transportation, and art and architecture.
  
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    HIST 363 - Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the history of western Christianity from the end of the apostolic period to the end of the Middle Ages, emphasizing both institutional and theological development.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 364 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL
     
  
  •  

    HIST 364 - Christian Church I: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    See HIST 363  for course description.
    FALL
  
  •  

    HIST 365 - Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth Century (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 366 - Christian Church II: From the Reformation Through the Twentieth Century (IN-6)


    3 hours

    A study of the reorientation of western Christianity, beginning with the Protestant Reformation and culminating with contemporary religious trends.
    This course is cross-listed with HIST 365 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 372 - Modern China


    3 hours

    This course on both ‘modern Chinese history’ and ‘China today’ examines events and periods in China’s history since the Opium Wars. Throughout the semester students will also be given readings and will participate in discussions which juxtapose modern Chinese history with current events in China today. Thus this course is more than just a study of modern Chinese history, but also a study of how that history impacts the Chinese today. Students will use Chinese history as a tool for understanding the direction and decisions of the Chinese government and the challenges that government faces in the contemporary era. These contemporary challenges will also be placed within the context of three broad themes that appear most important to the Communist Chinese Party today: Stability, sustainability, and territorial integrity. Within these themes major challenges facing China today will be framed within a historical perspective and students will develop a new lens, a Chinese historical lens, through which they will use to interpret contemporary China.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 372 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 374 - History of England (W)


    3 hours

    A survey of the history of Great Britain from Roman times to the twentieth century, emphasizing political, cultural, and economic developments which have influenced western civilization as a whole.
    FALL
  
  •  

    HIST 375 - Ancient Mediterranean World (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the three stages of ancient civilization, the Ancient Near East, Greece, Rome, and the contribution each has made to the development of western culture.
  
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    HIST 379 - American Foreign Policy


    3 hours

    This course will examine American foreign policy since the mid-1930s. Major themes of American foreign policy and diplomacy will be engaged. This will begin with American public diplomacy in the late 1930s, will continue through WWII, shifting strategies during the Cold War, in the post-Cold War, and post-9/11. We will also touch on the nuts and bolts of policy making and how the State Department’s Foreign Services Officers, the military’s Special Forces, and the CIA’s clandestine Directorate of Operations help inform, shape, and carry out American foreign policy. Special attention will also be given to the role religion has played in the shaping of American foreign policy.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 379 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
  •  

    HIST 380 - Pirates, Captives, and Slaves in the Early Modern World (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A survey of piracy and slavery in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean worlds from 1500 to 1750. Readings will include personal captivity narratives as well as biographies of pirates and histories of the slave trade.
    FALL | WINTER
  
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    HIST 386 - Medieval Europe (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of European history from the fall of Rome to the beginning of the modern age, focusing on those developments which have influenced the institutions and values of modern western civilization. The chronological emphasis is on the eleventh through the sixteenth centuries.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 387 - Europe in the Nineteenth Century (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    A study of Europe’s “long century,” from the French Revolution of 1789 to the beginning of World War I in 1914. The course traces Europe’s development from a predominantly aristocratic and agricultural culture to an emerging democratic and industrial civilization, devoting particular attention to cultural and social changes.
  
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    HIST 388 - Contemporary Europe (IN-6) (W)


    3 hours

    An assessment of political developments and international relations since the outbreak of World War I. Such antithetical forces as peace and war, power and weakness, and sovereignty and dependence are studied in their historical setting. Students may earn either history or political science credit, depending on individual assignments.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 388 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
  
  •  

    HIST 389 - History of the Holocaust (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the historical and social circumstances leading to and surrounding the Jewish Holocaust. This course explores several theories of the event.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 464 - Topics in History


    1-3 hours

    Selected topics in history presented in classroom setting. Subjects covered will determine whether credit is granted in Area I general education. This course may be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    HIST 465 - Topics in History [465 typically qualifies as a (W) course]


    3 hours

    See HIST 265  for course description.
  
  •  

    HIST 471 - History of Western Thought to 1500 (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the key thinkers in western thought from the Heroic Age of Greece to the Renaissance. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize the discussion and analysis of ideas that have formed the basis of western thought. Included in the readings are selections from Herodotus, Cicero, St. Augustine, Boccaccio, Montaigne, and St. Ignatius of Loyola.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 471 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 472 - History of Western Thought since 1500 (W)


    3 hours

    A study of the key thinkers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading from original sources, this class will emphasize discussion of critical ideas that have affected the evolution of contemporary social and political thought. Included in the readings are selections from Locke, Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Lenin, and Hitler.
    This course is cross-listed with PLSC 472 . A student may receive credit for this course from only one program.
    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    HIST 490 - Senior Exam Preparation


    1 hour

    Independent Study and reading in preparation for the one hour oral assessment exam taken by senior history majors.
    FALL
  
  •  

    HIST 494 - International Study Tour


    3 hours

    See HIST 294  for course description.
    SUMMER
  
  •  

    HIST 495 - Directed Study (W)


    1-3 hours

    See HIST 295  for course description.
  
  •  

    HIST 496 - U.S. Study Tour


    3 hours

    See HIST 296  for course description.
  
  •  

    HIST 497 - Research Methods in History (W)


    3 hours

    Historical theories, procedures, and research methods are examined in conjunction with the preparation of a research project using primary sources. No general education credit given. Lab Fee: 6 ($90).
    Prerequisite(s):  ; Word processing and familiarity with Internet searches are prerequisites to this course; Students must have completed at least one writing (W) class.
    FALL

Health Education

  
  •  

    HLED 129 - Introduction to Wellness


    2 hours

    This course provides an overview of the wellness profession including its history, current trends, opportunities, and exposure to the wellness thought process. An understanding of the philosophical undergirdings of the wellness profession is explored and developed. This course requires ten (10) hours of field based experience.
    FALL
  
  •  

    HLED 173 - Health for Life


    2 hours

    The study of the six dimensions of health forms the foundation of this course. The health dimensions are: Physical, social, spiritual, psychological, intellectual, and environmental. The class focus will be to integrate healthful living with today’s scientific research and Christianity into a balanced lifestyle. Specific topics include: Alcohol, tobacco, and drugs; mental health; weight management; fitness; human sexuality; safety; nutrition; and stress. Perspectives of health, particularly from Ellen G. White, and others will be explored.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HLED 210 - Medical Terminology


    1 hour

    Medical terminology is the study of the principles of medical word building to help the student develop the extensive medical vocabulary used in health care occupations. Students receive a thorough grounding in basic medical terminology through a study of root words, prefixes and suffixes. The study focuses on correct pronunciation, spelling and use of medical terms. Anatomy, physiology, and pathology of disease are discussed yet no previous knowledge of these topics is necessary.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HLED 229 - Wellness Applications


    2 hours

    Learn how to live life with more passion, peace, purpose, and vitality. Learn how to bring more balance into your life through a practical application of the principles of wellness. This course teaches what wellness is by empowering the student to personally apply the tools of wellness. These tools encourage the development of the dynamic potential of body, mind, and spirit. This in turn brings about a balanced development of the whole person.
    WINTER
  
  •  

    HLED 250 - Corporate Wellness Environments


    2 hours

    Corporate Wellness Environments provides students with knowledge of the role that wellness programs and professionals play in the corporate arena. Students will identify several different types of corporate wellness programs and engage in shadowing activities in these various environments. The benefits of a wellness program for the corporation and the individual will be discussed. Interviews with wellness professionals will also be conducted.
    FALL | WINTER
  
  •  

    HLED 265 - Topics in Health Education


    1-3 hours

    Topics selected from areas of health education not covered in other courses. This course may be repeated for credit.
    FALL | WINTER
 

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